Sykes Picot Agreement Document Pdf

In the chain of agreements between France, Russia and Great Britain, the Russian demands were first confirmed: France confirmed their agreement on 26 April and Britain on 23 May, with formal sanctions on 23 October. The Anglo-French agreement was confirmed in an exchange of letters on 9 May and 16 May. [37] 8. For a period of twenty years, the existing Turkish tariff remains in effect in all blue and red zones, as well as in zones A and B, and there is no increase in tariffs or conversion of value at certain rates, unless agreed between the two powers. The Sykes-Picot Agreement (officially the 1916 agreement in Asia Minor) was a secret agreement reached during world war I between the British and French governments on the division of the Ottoman Empire between the Allies. Russia also participated in the talks. The agreement is seen by many as a turning point in Western and Arab relations. She denied the promises made by the United Kingdom to the Arabs[9] concerning a national Arab homeland in the region of Syria in exchange for British support for the Ottoman Empire. The agreement was made public with others on 23 November 1917 in Moscow by the Bolsheviks[10] and repeated on 26 November 1917 in the British Guardian, so that “the British were displaced, the Arabs appalled and the Turks happy.” [11] [12] [13] The legacy of the agreement has caused too much discontent in the region, particularly among the Denarabern, but also among the Kurds, who were denied an independent state. [14] [15] [16] [17] Hussein`s letter of February 18, 1916, McMahon appealed for 50,000 pounds of gold, more weapons, ammunition and food, saying Feisal was waiting for “no less than 100,000 people” to arrive for the planned revolt and McMahon`s response of 10 March 1916 confirming British approval of the applications and concluding the ten letters from correspondents. In April and May, Sykes discussed the benefits of a meeting in which Picot and the Arabs participated to network each other`s wishes. At the same time, logistics have been dealt with in the context of the promised revolt, and there has been growing impatience with what Hussein should do.

Finally, at the end of April, McMahon was informed of the terms of Sykes-Picot and Grey and agreed that they would not be disclosed to the Arabs. [54] [55]:57-60 After comparing the wishes of all parties concerned, namely the British, the French and the Arabs, the two statesmen devised a compromise solution. The terms of the division agreement were set out in a letter of 9 May 1916 addressed by Paul Cambon, French Ambassador to London, to Sir Edward Grey, British Foreign Minister.